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History

 

become an active and aware global citizen

The History Department endeavors to understand both the facts and the interpretation of history. Our students gain the skills to gather evidence, pose and answer questions, find and evaluate sources of information, and communicate complex ideas effectively. The different courses emphasize skill development and individual growth of each student.  

As a Salisbury history student you will also be equipped with the ability to access, evaluate, and use different forms of communication to exercise critical thinking, demonstrate international awareness, communicate complex ideas effectively, and employ problem-solving skills that will help make you an active and aware global citizen.

History Offerings At Salisbury:

Third Form

H112 Ancient History 

A required course in the Third Form Year, Ancient History explores the development of early civilizations, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, Greece, China, India, and Rome. Essential elements of each civilization provide the framework for study. The areas of religion, politics, art, economics, social structure, and daily life present a well-rounded view of the origins, histories, and legacies of diverse ancient lands. Organizational, writing, and study skills are emphasized, as well as both individual and collaborative work.  

Fourth Form

H222 World History 

A required course in the Fourth Form Year, World History takes a thematic approach to studying the past with an emphasis on how past developments and patterns can help understand the world today. Thematic questions include, but are not limited to; How do governments evolve? How does technology and trade influence society? What causes social reform? Are individuals or social forces more responsible for shaping history? Writing, critical reading, collaboration, and communication skills are emphasized. 

H221 World History Honors 

The World History Honors course will focus on issues from around the globe and is recommended for any student looking to take Advanced Placement courses in the future. Critical reading and writing skills are emphasized throughout the year, and students will work closely with both primary and secondary documents while exploring political, social, economic, spiritual connections around the globe. Students must be recommended for this course. 

Fifth Form

H331AP US History 

The Advanced Placement course covers the major political, economic, social, and cultural issues ranging from the pre-Columbian era to the present. Some of the major skills sharpened in class include causation, periodization, contextualization and analysis. Understanding and interpreting primary and secondary sources is essential for success, and summer work is required. More information about the curriculum is available on the College Board website. Students taking AP US History are required to take the AP exam in May and must be approved for the course.  

H331H United States History Honors 

This course is a survey of the development of the American Nation from the colonial period to World War II. Emphasis is placed on the development of critical reading competency, the growth of writing and analytical skills, the use of evidence to support an argument, and collaboration and public speaking. Students must be recommended for this course. 

H332 US History 

This course is a survey of the development of the American Nation from the colonial period to World War I. Emphasis is placed on the development of critical reading competency, effective note taking, the growth of writing and analytical skills, the use of evidence to support an argument, collaboration and public speaking.   

Sixth Form

H441W Advanced Placement World History 

This Advanced Placement course explores World History from the 11th century to the present with an emphasis on the major political, religious, social, and cultural connections around the globe. The course requires extensive reading and writing skills and students must be comfortable working with primary and secondary sources. More information about the curriculum is available on the College Board website. Students taking AP World History are required to take the AP exam in May and must be approved for the course. Summer work is required.  

H342MA Modern Asian History 

As the twenty first century progresses, no country will be more important to know than the People’s Republic of China, and no region plays a bigger role in shaping the world than the Middle East. Themes covered throughout the course of the year include but are not limited to China struggling and succeeding in engaging modernity, China’s relations with its neighbors and issues including Taiwan, Xinjiang, and Tibet, the creation of Israel, Palestine, Syria, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran, and Iraq. The course utilizes primary and secondary sources, documentaries, as well as two books the class reads together. 

h342mp Modern Politics and Current Issues  

Modern Politics and Current Issues is a highly interactive course that provides students with an appreciation of how government works to develop policies and address the key challenges American faces in the 21st Century.  Students will use their understanding of American government, the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights as well as the media, political parties, and special interest groups to confront and debate key issues of today.  Students will engage in activities to understand the formulation of public policy in America and the struggles associated with reaching consensus through the lens of current issues as well as the campaign for the Presidency and Congressional leadership in 2020. 

h342ge Grand Expectations – America in the Age of Civil Rights and Vietnam 

This course takes a close look at one of our nation’s most promising and turbulent eras in the 20th Century. Themes include the civil rights movement and the historical forces that shaped the successes and failures of the movement, issues of race in our world today, the Vietnam conflict at home and abroad, American exceptionalism and vulnerability. A research project is required in the winter trimester, and the course emphasizes reading, writing, and communication skills.  

H342CW America and the Cold War 

This course examines the conflict between the United States and The Soviet Union which was one of the most dominant social forces in the twentieth century. At home Cold War rhetoric and fear helped shape domestic policy and pop culture, and overseas the conflict touched every region of the world and unleashed developments that profoundly shape the global community today. The course emphasizes skills over content, with specific attention paid to developing and defending an argument, research, collaboration, and public speaking.  

H342CG 20th Century Global Issues 

This course is designed to provide a foundation for understanding the political. Economic, cultural, and physical geography of some non-western countries. Current events form an important part of classroom discussions. The impact of the past upon the present is stressed through an exploration of the roots of current conditions and conflicts. Readings incorporate material on the ideas, warfare, technology, science, philosophy and religion. 

History Department Requirements for Honors

Students who wish to take an Honors or AP course in World or US History need to have demonstrated most of the following qualities and skills. Earning the appropriate grade does not automatically qualify a student, and students who have not earned the appropriate grade, but have demonstrated the following qualities, may be recommended for an Honors or AP level course. 

Honors World History and Honors US History Requirements: 
  • High academic achievement and intellectual ability.  
    •       B+ minimum in Ancient History and World History 
    •       B in World History Honors 
  • Self-motivation and self-discipline.  
  • Good organizational skills. 
  • Strong written and spoken expression. 
  • An ability to work independently and collaboratively. 
  • Remain on task in class  

Advanced Placement US History and AP World History Requirements: 

  • High academic achievement and intellectual ability.  
    •             A- or better in Honors World or Honors US History 
    •             B or better in AP US History and at least a 3 on the AP US test 
  • Self-motivation and self-discipline. Consistent work ethic is critical. 
  • Good organizational skills. Excellent active reading skills.  Strong written and spoken expression. 
  • Comfortable working with a variety of primary and secondary sources Strong analytical and reasoning skills 
  • Demonstrates complex understanding of historical developments. 
  • Students should expect work over the summer and during vacations 

The academic life at Salisbury is motivating. The teachers, coaches, and mentors at Salisbury are exceptional. They bring passion and expertise into their intimate classroom settings. Collaboration, innovation, problem solving, creativity, and civic responsibility are just some of the principles that guide Salisbury School’s educational model. Most importantly, these men and women partner with you each day and always with the highest expectations. 
Dean of Academic Life Sarah Mulrooney

A Glimpse At Just Two Of Our Offerings:

Modern Politics and Current Issues

Modern Politics and Current Issues is a highly interactive course that provides students with an appreciation of how government works to develop policies and address the key challenges American faces in the 21st Century.  Students will use their understanding of American government, the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights as well as the media, political parties, and special interest groups to confront and debate key issues of today.  Students will engage in activities to understand the formulation of public policy in America and the struggles associated with reaching consensus through the lens of current issues as well as the campaign for the Presidency and Congressional leadership in 2020. 

Grand Expectations – America in the Age of Civil Rights and Vietnam 

This course takes a close look at one of our nation’s most promising and turbulent eras in the 20th Century. Themes include the civil rights movement and the historical forces that shaped the successes and failures of the movement, issues of race in our world today, the Vietnam conflict at home and abroad, American exceptionalism and vulnerability. A research project is required in the winter trimester, and the course emphasizes reading, writing, and communication skills.